Bulletin Board

A Day in the Life of a Patient Advocate

by Advocation Services Partners

It’s 5:45 a.m. and my cell phone is already ringing. This can’t be good. And, in fact, it isn’t. Grace’s husband, Jim, is calling to let me know that Grace’s nephrostomy tube has come loose and Grace is in great pain. I suggest he call the ambulance and have the ambulance get her to Pretty Good Hospital. “But Not So Good Hospital is closer,” Jim replies.

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The Power of Appreciation

by Advocation Services Partners

It never ceases to amaze me how two little words — thank you — can make such a difference with healthcare providers.

If I’m lucky, physicians see me as a partner, not an adversary. However, I’m not always that lucky. Sometimes, it’s simply a look. More often, it’s a seemingly innocuous question: who are you? It’s typically left to my client to introduce me as her advocate and, depending on the tone of her introduction and how we immediately communicate with the physician, we have either set the stage for a winning partnership or a terrible disaster.

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Hospitalists and the Decline of Comprehensive Care

by Richard Gunderman, M.D., Ph.D., The New England Journal of Medecine.
Originally published September 15, 2016

Medical specialization dates back at least to the time of Galen. For most of medicine’s history, however, the boundaries of medical fields have been based on factors such as patient age (pediatrics and geriatrics), anatomical and physiological systems (ophthalmology and gastroenterology), and the physician’s toolset (radiology and surgery). Hospital medicine, by contrast, is defined by the location in which care is delivered. Whether such delineation is a good or bad sign for physicians, patients, hospitals, and society hinges on how we understand the interests and aspirations of each of these groups.

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Is your Personal Health Information (PHI) really private? Think again.

It is almost impossible to safeguard any information that is stored/shared technologically. The question isn’t ‘if’ we’ll get hacked; the question is ‘when’. With all of the benefits availed to us as a result of the worldwide web, the risks we assume in accessing the web are enormous. No matter the healthcare provider, it is one thing to regulate disclosure of information and another thing to safeguard it.

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Exercise is NOT a Four Letter Word

by Julia Miller, MS

Exercise often unfairly gets a bad rap; many people equate it with hard (or boring) work and sore muscles. The good news is that to be physically active you don’t have to “exercise.”

If we think of physical activity as movement and not just “exercise,” our options increase exponentially. We can go on walks with our best friend (human or canine), play with our kids or grandkids, do some gardening or put on our favorite music and shake our booty. We can incorporate formal exercise into our life with group classes such as Zumba and Tai Chi or customize a program with a personal trainer or Pilates instructor. As a Pilates instructor I’m partial to Pilates because it involves full body movement, improves balance and gets the brain working!

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How To Find a Doctor

If you have been diagnosed with cancer, finding a doctor and treatment facility for your cancer care is an important step to getting the best treatment possible. Although the health care system is complex, resources are available to guide you in finding a doctor, getting a second opinion, and choosing a treatment facility.

by the National Cancer Institute.

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Cancer and Friendship

When dealing with cancer, it’s almost inevitable to reflect on one’s life and relationships. So, in the interest of having a well-examined life (well, I’m sort of interested right now), and thinking of how nice my eventual obituary will read if I’m mourned by millions of close friends, I’ve decided to consider the pros and cons of expanding my friendwork.

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